Sunday, February 11, 2018

The Bubbly Side of Prosecco

It's a little belated, but Happy New Year's, everyone! I hope that 2018 has started well for you all!

I continue to maintain (and embrace) the Ketogenic way of eating. In case you missed the back story, you can find it in this post. Many people have asked me how I maintain ketosis as a wine lover/wine blogger? I have done some research on the net grams of carbs of all wines. I will have to restrict my consumption of sweet and red wines, but this infograph shows the most keto-friendly options:

Photo Courtesy of ruled.me

As you can see, sparkling white wines are the most keto-friendly! This means that I'll be focusing a LOT of time on Prosecco, Cremants (the non-Champagne sparkling wines of France), and other New World bubblies to keep on track. There may also be a future post on Pinot Blanc later this year comparing Alsatian wines vs New World!

Let's start with Prosecco. I spent last Autumn tasting and learning more about Prosecco and the region it comes from in Italy. Nestled high on the hills of Valdobbiadene in the NE corner of Italy, the Glera grape, formerly known as Prosecco, is grown here. Prosecco's bubbles are made in a method called "Charmat"; this means that the second fermentation occurs in a sealed tank, instead of in the bottle like Champagne. This creates a sparkling wine that shines with floral and light stone fruit aromas and flavours.

The Villa Sandi "Il Fresco" Prosecco DOC is abundant with white blossom on the nose, and carries a flavour profile full of fresh gala apples, underripe pineapple, and an intriguing candied grapefruit finish. Delicate and fresh, with a slightly creamy mouthfeel. Great value for the price, I paid under $20 for this gem! 


The Val D'Oca Prosecco Superiore DOCG shows a more playful side of Prosecco, with zippy acidity, delicate but lively mousse, and notes of pear, navel oranges, and a hint of white peach on the finish. Beautifully crafted and a real crowd-pleaser!


The Desiderio Jeio Brut Prosecco DOCG is more elegant in style, with flavours of lemon zest, green apple, and a bright, citrus finish. An intriguing hint of fresh white bread mid-palate adds depth, creating a food-friendly bubbly that pairs well with lighter dishes like chicken and salads.


Finally, the Col de Salici Prosecco Superiore DOCG reflects the traditional flavour profile of Prosecco, along with added complexity from notes of fresh almonds and a steely backbone. Crisp and clean acidity combined with creamy mousse on the palate creates elegance and a Prosecco with finesse!

What I loved about the Prosecco tasting is its lively, fresh style, and the QPR compared to other sparkling wines. I did find, however, that Prosecco is pretty straightforward across the board. There didn't seem to be a lot of nuances that made each bottle unique. With that said, Prosecco is easy to enjoy and you're guaranteed consistency in most of the bottles you buy!

So what's next? I am moving my proverbial "Bubbly Train" back north to France to taste my way through the Cremants (French sparkling wines made outside of the Champagne region) of Alsace, Burgundy, and the Loire Valley. Stay tuned for more bubbly fun from the Wine Concubine!

Cheers! 



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